Texas Women - Marching with Ann Richards

Social Studies, Grades K-5

By watching and analyzing primary source video, students will learn about notable Texas women, including Ann Richards, Barbara Jordan, Miriam “Ma” Ferguson, and Liz Carpenter.  Students will analyze speeches and actions in the films to achieve a better understanding of government terminology and civic engagement.

  • Prior Knowledge Prior Knowledge
  • Hook Hook
  • Lesson Lesson
  • Extended Learning Extended Learning
  • Resources Resources
  • TEKS TEKS
  • Worksheets Worksheets
  • Lesson Plan Use Lesson Plan Use
  1. Students should be aware of the three branches of government, the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Texas Constitution.
  2. Students should be aware of basic government principles including democracy, republic, free elections, individual rights, freedom of speech, and the role of elected representatives such as legislators, governors, and judges.
  3. Students should have a working knowledge of human rights and the privileges of citizenship. 
  4. Students should also have some knowledge of notable Texas women politicians. 
Naming Political Leaders 
  1. Divide the board into four columns.
  2. Ask the students to name political leaders from the past or present, and write those in the first column on the board.
  3. Ask students to name political leaders in Texas from the past or present, and write those names in the next column. 
  4. Ask students to name female politicians from the past and present, and write those in the third column. 
  5. Finally, ask students to name female politicians in or from Texas.
    1. Ask the students if they notice any differences in the number of people named in each column. 
    2. Ask them why they think fewer women are elected to office than men if women are over half of the population. 
    3. Ask them what historical obstacles from the past prevented women from running for office.
    4. Ask them what current obstacles may prevent women from running for office.
      1. Use the Texas Women: Dilemmas for Women Seeking Elected Office Fact Sheet to enhance this discussion. Click on the source links to show different statistics regarding men and women officeholders. Ask the students about gender stereotyping dilemmas for women. 
      2. Ask the students to think about how far women have come. Ask them to think about historical achievements by women in the 20th and 21st centuries. Visit the Firsts for Women in Politics section of the Center for American Women and Politics website  and scroll down this updated list to examine women’s key achievements. 
      3. Examine the number of women elected to office (state legislators, governor, or Congress) state by state by viewing the chart on the Center for American Women and Politics website.  Click on the state of Texas to examine statistics or follow this link: http://www.cawp.rutgers.edu/fast_facts/resources/state_fact_sheets/TX.php
  1. Have the students read short biographies on the two female Texas governors, Miriam “Ma” Ferguson and Ann Richards, from The Handbook of Texas Online.
    1. Miriam “Ma” Ferguson’s Bio
    2. Ann Richards’ Bio
  2. Watch “Austin at Issue”, a primary source video featuring Cactus Pryor, Liz Carpenter, and John Henry Faulk discussing women in Texas. These Texas legends compare Miriam “Ma” Ferguson to Ann Richards at the request of a caller. Biographical information on Pryor, Faulk, and Carpenter is available on the tabs below the video. Students will use the biographies and this video to answer the first two questions on their corresponding worksheet.
  3. Now, show the primary source video “The 1991 Texas Inauguration of Governor Ann Richards.” Use the segmented clips below, and pause from time to time to assist students with key concepts and vocabulary based on the worksheet.
    1. Click on the link and press play
      1. Section 1
      2. Section 2
      3. Section 3
      4. Section 4
      5. Section 5
  1. Ask the students to volunteer the democratic principles they value most, and write the key terms on the board. Give students time to reflect and write a thoughtful short essay in the last section of the worksheet.
  2. Organize a March on the Classroom
    1. Ask students to create posters using key words and terms that reflect the principles they value most.  Teachers can create a classroom banner with the school, town, and or county’s name on it to lead the march.
    2. When students finish writing and decorating their signs, then have them line up to march around the classroom in order. Have each student stop by your desk and interview them about what their posters mean. 
Students can learn more about the late former Texas Governor Ann Richards from KLRU’s film “’In the Dome’ - Ann Richards Remembered”.
TEKS
Social Studies Kindergarten
 
2B - Identify contributions of patriots and good citizens who have shaped the community
 
8A - Identify purposes for having rules
 
9A - Identify authority figures in the home, school, and community
 
9B - Explain how authority figures make and enforce rules
 
14B - Obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid visual sources such as pictures, symbols, electronic media, print material, and artifacts
 
15B - Create and interpret visuals, including pictures and maps
 
Social Studies Grade 1
 
2C - Compare the similarities and differences among the lives and activities of historical figures and other individuals who have influenced the community, state, and nation
 
11A - Explain the purpose for rules and laws in the home, school, and community
 
12A - Identify the responsibilities of authority figures in the home, school, and community
 
12C - Identify and describe the role of a good citizen in maintaining a constitutional republic
 
13A - Identify characteristics of good citizenship, including truthfulness, justice, equality, respect for oneself and others, responsibility in daily life, and participation in government by educating oneself about the issues, respectfully holding public officials to their word, and voting
 
13C - Identify other individuals who exemplify good citizenship
 
14C - Identify anthems and mottoes of Texas and the United States
 
14D - Explain and practice voting as a way of making choices and decisions
 
18A - Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences
 
18B - Create and interpret visual and written material
 
Social Studies Grade 2
 
11A - Identify functions of governments such as establishing order, providing security, and managing conflict
 
11B - Identify governmental services in the community such as police and fire protection, libraries, schools, and parks and explain their value to the community
 
12A - Name current public officials, including mayor, governor, and president
 
12B - Compare the roles of public officials, including mayor, governor, and president
 
12D - Identify how citizens participate in their own governance through staying informed of what public officials are doing, providing input to them, and volunteering to participate in government functions
 
13A - Identify characteristics of good citizenship, including truthfulness, justice, equality, respect for oneself and others, responsibility in daily life, and participation in government by educating oneself about the issues, respectfully holding public officials to their word, and voting
 
14C - Identify selected symbols such as state and national birds and flowers and patriotic symbols such as the U.S. and Texas flags and Uncle Sam
 
18B - Obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid visual sources such as pictures, maps, electronic sources, literature, reference sources, and artifacts
 
19A - Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences
 
19B - Create written and visual material such as stories, poems, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas
 
Social Studies Grade 3
 
9A - Describe the basic structure of government in the local community, state, and nation
 
9B - Identify local, state, and national government officials and explain how they are chosen
 
9C - Identify services commonly provided by local, state, and national governments
 
9D - Explain how local, state, and national government services are financed
 
10B - Describe and explain the importance of the concept of "consent of the governed" as it relates to the functions of local, state, and national government
 
11A - Identify characteristics of good citizenship, including truthfulness, justice, equality, respect for oneself and others, responsibility in daily life, and participation in government by educating oneself about the issues, respectfully holding public officials to their word and voting
 
11C - Identify and explain the importance of individual acts of civic responsibility, including obeying laws, serving the community, serving on a jury, and voting
 
12B - Identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community
 
17C - Interpret oral, visual, and print material by identifying the main idea, distinguishing between fact and opinion, identifying cause and effect, and comparing and contrasting
 
17E - Interpret and create visuals, including graphs, charts, tables, timelines, illustrations, and maps
 
18A - Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences
 
18C - Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation
 
Social Studies Grade 4
 
5C - Identify the accomplishments of notable individuals in Texas
 
8B - Describe and explain the location and distribution of various towns and cities in Texas and explain their distribution, past and present
 
15B - Identify and explain the basic functions of the three branches of state government according to the Texas Constitution
 
15C - Identify the intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the Bill of Rights (Celebrate Freedom Week)
 
17A - Identify important individuals who have participated voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels 
 
17B - Explain how individuals can participate voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels through activities such as holding public officials to their word, writing letters, and participating in historic preservation and service projects
 
17C - Explain the duty of the individual in state and local elections such as being informed and voting
 
17D - Identify the importance of historical figures such as Sam Houston, Barbara Jordan, and Lorenzo de Zavala and important individuals who modeled active participation in the democratic process such as Sam Houston, Barbara Jordan, Lorenzo de Zavala, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Henry B. González, James A. Baker III, Wallace Jefferson, and other local individuals
 
17E - Explain how to contact elected and appointed leaders in state and local governments
 
18A - Identify leaders in state, local, and national governments, including the governor, selected local members of the Texas Legislature, the local mayor, U.S. senators, local U.S. representatives, and Texans who have been president of the United States, and their political parties
 
18B - Identify leadership qualities of state and local leaders, past and present
 
19A - Identify the similarities and differences within and among various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in Texas
 
21A - Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas
 
22B - Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication 
 
22C - Express ideas orally based on research and experiences
 
22D - Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies
 
22E - Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation
 
Social Studies Grade 5
 
16A - Identify and explain the basic functions of the three branches of government
 
16C - Distinguish between national and state governments and compare their responsibilities in the U.S. federal system
 
18A - Explain the duty individuals have to participate in civic affairs at the local, state, and national levels
 
18B - Explain how to contact elected and appointed leaders in local, state, and national governments
 
22C - Summarize the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to our national identity
 
24A - Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States
 
24D - Identify different points of view about an issue, topic, or current event
 
24E - Identify the historical context of an event
 
25A - Use social studies terminology correctly
 
25B - Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication
 
25C - Express ideas orally based on research and experiences
 
25D - Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies
 
25E - Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation
 
 
All content in this lesson plan is copyright of the Texas Archive of the Moving Image. Use of this lesson plan is free to educators for classroom use. It may not be reproduced without credit or used for commercial purposes.